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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve ca
speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [
of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech spec that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. [singing] hoveround takes me where i wanna go... where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll be singing too! pick up the phone and call hoveround, the premier power chair. hoveround makes it easier than any other power chair. hoveround is more maneuverable to get you through the tightest doors and hallways. more reliable. hoveround employees build your chair, deliver your chair, and will service your chair for as long as you own your chair. most importantly, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for little or no cost. call now for your free dvd and information kit. you don't really
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it. free checking and check it out beca
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
of a books will look at science history, the cyberworld, popular culture, live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span 2. >> the bureau of labor statistics has announced the unemployment rate has dropped from 8.1% to 7.8% in september, the lowest level since january 2009. president obama spoken by the job picture at this venue at george mason university. it is about 30 minutes. >> hello, everybody! [cheers and applause] hello, george mason! hello, patriots! [cheers and applause] good to see you guys. thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you! thank you. thank you so much. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you. everybody, have a seat. have a seat. thank you. well, it is good to be here. i am so proud to have katherine's support. can you give her a big round of applause for that great introduction. [applause] it's also good to know that we've got the former governor and next united states senator from the commonwealth of virginia, tim kaine! and your congressman, jerry conley. [cheers] and good to see all of you. so one month. just one month from tomorrow, virginia, you're goi
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
's science or engineers or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that's allowed things to get so low. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed at the end of the day it's greed and lack of leadership tot point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money or prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. >> one of the problems we have with american manufacture manuf we're older. we are used to paper and those types of things. china has natural sources electronically. we know one of the things we can do in america is move more in the internet age in our manufacturing and bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy as many people see it as or should it be a global trading partner. >> i think we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something, that's great but guess what, america
i've ever seen in my life. >> reporter: the science of destruction, a picture-perfect crash, a wrecked jetliner and a treasure trove of new information about what it takes to survive the unthinkable. for "good morning america," neal karlinsky, abc news, detroit. >> so don't sit in first class. >> yeah. >> and don't hold your baby in your lap. >> and buy an extra seat for that child. yeah. >> fascinating report. our thanks to neal karlinsky and "curiosity plane crash" airs on the discovery channel tonight. >>> coming up here on "good morning america," open wide, the innovative solution one family found for the baby who just would not eat. ♪ gangnam style [ male announcer ] at walgreens, we know kids share all kinds of things, especially germs. that's why you always get your flu shot. this year, walgreens will do you one better, and check if there are any other immunizations you might need -- absolutely free, no appointment necessary. preparing you for years of unplanned sharing to come. at walgreens and take care clinics, we've got all kinds of ways to arm yourself for flu
in a prison fight. it nathan leopold basically will his body to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so h
's some political science that suggests obama's approval rating is higher than it should be because he's getting a certain benefit of the doubt because people still remember who was president in september 2008, remember where the economy was in january 2009 and giving them, like clinton did at the convention, willing to give obama a little more slack than they would be giving the normal president with 8% unemployment. >> what do you think is the thing to look for tonight? >> to me, you were getting at this in the first segment, involves specificity. he know obama will show up and demand romney start providing details about, you want to cut taxes for everybody, deficit neutral, you say you'll deal with deductions and loopholes so let's talk about which deductions and loopholes. it's standard for the opponent to do that. is jim lehrer going to be there demanding and pressing for specific answers from romney that romney has refused to give in this campaign for obvious reasons because they would be politically poisonous if he gets into them. >> will jim lehrer hope the other guy will do it
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> beer's going to have the fed minutes right at the top of the hour. then we're going to look at how big ben, the puppet master, pulls the strings behind the scenes of the central bank to get what he wants. >>> we're also going to take a look at the real jobs killers in america. we debate whether safety nets are really anchors on our economy. >>> what our kids should really be taught for all that money. lots of things coming up on street signs. back to "power lunch." >>> jamie dimon was one of wall street's heroes during the economic meltdown but his
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. i'm sharon epperson at the nymex. gold closing right now right where we started the week. gold prices closing just around $1,780 an ounce. we're down $14, $15 on the session. of course the fact that we got a better than expected jobs number means that we probably won't see quicker stimulus, though there may not be much change to what the federal reserve has already laid out in terms what have they're doing with monetary easing. gold prices this week have come close to the $1,800 level but have been unable to close above that mark. last week when china's back in session and we have geopolitics on the horizon, it could be a different picture. keep your eye on south africa in terms in palladium and platinum. back to you. >>> check out these gas prices. they're averaging about $3.80 a gallon pretty much across the country. but imagine this -- what if the u.s. started running low on gasoline? in parts of car crazy, california, my old home, that's become a reality and prices are indeed soarin
's not an accident. it was actually planned in the name of science, trying to prove if you could survive a catastrophe just like this. people behind the fiery experiment will join us to talk about what they learned. >>> an emotional ann romney talks about a ritual her husband will prepare before the presidential debate. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners gi
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the markets are truly sandwiched between politics and the economy. the debate last night, a lot of data today and tomorrow including the jobs number. and the opening bell. the s&p 500 at the top of your screen over the big board, steelcase, maker of business furniture. you might be sitting on some right now, celebrating its 100th anniversary over at the nasdaq. net element international, a mobile commerce and payment processing company celebrating its ipo today. and jim, there have been several of those, although, as we saw from lifelock, not all of them going the way the companies had wished. >> no, it's interesting, this company that's becoming public, it is a terrific household name. they make a lot of plastics that we all use, hard plastics is really their major initiative. plastic uses a lot of natural gas, which means that the margins should be going up. nobody cares. >> yeah, it priced below the range. bery is the ticker. it debuts here on the stock exchange. meantime, hewlett-packard, hitting another new low, down 1.5%. we di
on the science now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> reporter: former massachusetts chemist annie dookhan. >> could you tell us what happened. >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab now closed by the state dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. prosecutors accuse her of doctoring evidence to change test results. >> she would take known cocaine from an area that she knew was cocaine and actually add them to the sample to make it cocaine. >> incredible story. let's turn to cnn contributor paul callen for legal
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. melissa: oil prices remain stable as the market awaits u.s. inventory data which is expected to show a rise in oil supplies and a dip in gasoline inventories. sandra smith with more from the pits of the cme in today's trade. sandra? >> hi, melissa this market is definitely looking for bigger macroeconomic date to work off of. crude has been in out of positive territory for most of the session. couple things propping it up keeping it in the green of the right now it is at the flat line. spain is getting closer asking for a bailout. there is speculation of that. you have a weaker dollar scenario as the euro builds. that is increasing energy prices across the board. we're waiting inventory data tomorrow. jobs report on friday. leading up to that traders are flocking to the euro. euro is up dollar is down. that is helping to give a boost to some commodities. that is looking at natural gas prices. we're talking about there is new report out today th
infusion sciences from the ground up. good to see both of you. >> what are infusion sciences. >> it's the company name used in fusion that is the product. >> what is it. >> multi-vitamin. effervescent formula. >> you basically have discovered the fountain of youth is what it sounds like. >> exactly. >> how does it work? >> i'm 95. [ laughter ] >> you are doing something right. what's your secret. >> most people have difficulty swallowing pills. with that being said the goal is to create something that's effervescent that tastes good and actually encourages you to drink more water. >> what do you is get a cup of water. >> exactly. >> we rip open the little packet it has a tangerine taste to it. take it to the gym. >> perfect for travel. >> i will look young any minute let me try that. >> you don't need the help. >> you decided to start your own family business, linda. how tough has that been? >> it's very difficult. i have started businesses in the past so i'm used to doing that when buzz came to me with this wonderful formula i said we have got to do it. it's very difficult to even
is helpful to you in any way? >> there's a lot of emerging science. there's a percentage of americans that are trying gluten free to help them feel better, to help them achieve personal goals and you know, we hope that gluten free helps them get to where they want to go. >> it is a fad. there's no doubt the market research data shows that it's a fad. it's a $4.9 billion business. >> elizabeth sloan is one of the corrupt's leading experts on trends in the food industry. >> people believe that if they go do a gluten free diet, it's going to make them lose weight. there is no scientific evidence to show that's the case. >> everybody's doing it, everybody's talking about it, but it doesn't mean that it's good for everybody. >> dr. mark high man is the founder of the ultra medical center. >> is gluten healthy? >> gluten is not either healthy or unhealthy. it depends on whether your body is rejecting it. >> there's this sort of general feeling among people who don't know too much about it that giving up gluten is probably a good idea because it's going to make me healthier, true. >> if a fo
in it like martin landau, who you saw me cuddling up with, he is fantastic as the science teacher in this movie, and i loved every second. it's funny, has a great message, and a really bold choice to be black and white. tim burton, totally back in form on this one. >> the looks more adult humor. this is not for the little kiddy in your life, is it in. >> it's rated pg, and i definitely recommend that people take a look at his original short film. he did it in 1984. that's what he based the movie on. it's a little bit dark, but i do think the kids can handle it. but pay attention to that pg because there were times when even i was scared. >> okay, so how does it rank on the tomato meter? >> this movie is certified fresh. 86%, a hugely high score. i love it. yay, it's alive. >> that's very fun. just in time for the halloween holiday, so to speak. next movie, taken 2. taken 1 with liam neeson was huge back in the day. his daughter goes off to europe and gets kidnapped, she along with a friend, and now this sequel. here's a clip. >> how's it going? >> listen to me. it's happened again
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
, that going without gluten is helpful to you in any way? >> there's a lot of emerging science. there's a percentage of americans that are trying gluten-free to help them feel better, to help them achieve personal goals, and we hope that gluten-free helps them get to where they want to go. >> it is a fad. there's no doubt the research data shows that it's a fad. it's a $4.9 billion business. >> elizabeth sloan. >> people believe it's going to make them lose weight and there's no scientific evidence to show that's the case. >> everybody's talking about it, but it doesn't mean that it's good for everybody. >> reporter: dr. mark hyman is the founder of the ultra wellness center. >> reporter: is gluten healthy? >> it's not either healthy or unhealthy. it depends on whether your body is rejecting it. >> reporter: there's this general feeling of people that getting off gluten is a better idea because it's going to make me healthier. true? >> if a food has a health claim on it, it's probably unhealthy. >> well said. >>> still to come, the woman who survived a horrific accident that actually
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there. i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, we agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. i want to lower its for manufacturing. i want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give tax breaks for companies investing in the united states on energy. we agree we have to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production have been higher than they have been in years. we have to look at the energy source of the future like wind, solar, and biofuels and make those investments. all of this is possible. we have to close our deficit. we will discuss how we deal with our tax code and how we make sure we are reducing spending in a response away and have enough revenue to make those investments. governor romney's central economic plan calls for a $5 trillion tax cut on top of the extension of the bush tax cut. $2 trillion in additional milit
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)